Conservation and Restoration

Conservation plays a pivotal role in maintaining the delicate balance of our ecosystem, safeguarding biodiversity, and preserving the natural resources upon which all life depends. Invasive weed management is a crucial aspect of conservation efforts, as invasive species can outcompete native flora, disrupt ecosystems, and threaten the survival of indigenous wildlife. 

Seed propagation is a vital technique employed in conservation to regenerate and expand populations of threatened or endangered plant species. Through seed banks and propagation programs, scientists can collect, store, and cultivate seeds of rare plants, ensuring their genetic diversity is preserved for future generations. This approach is instrumental in the conservation of plant species facing habitat loss, climate change, and other threats. By promoting seed propagation, conservationists bolster the resilience of plant populations, reinforcing their capacity to adapt to changing environmental conditions. In summary, the holistic approach of conservation, encompassing invasive weed management, restoration efforts, and seed propagation, serves as a powerful mechanism to protect and enhance the health of our ecosystems, fostering a sustainable coexistence between humans and the natural world.

Conservation Topics

By implementing effective strategies for the control and eradication of invasive plants, conservationists help restore the integrity of ecosystems, allowing native species to thrive and contribute to the overall ecological resilience. Furthermore, restoration projects play a key role in conservation, involving the rehabilitation of degraded habitats and the reintroduction of native species. These efforts not only enhance biodiversity but also contribute to the ecosystem’s ability to adapt to environmental changes.

ARP River Mile 13 South Stewardship

The Sacramento Valley Chapter is a Volunteer Mile Steward through the American River Parkway Foundation’s Adopt-the-Parkway initiative. The Mile Steward program allows groups to sponsor 1-mile sections on either side of the American River along the entire 23-mile length of the Parkway. We volunteer our time as stewards of the Parkway to help maintain this special landscape for everyone to enjoy. Our River Mile is on the east/south side of the river, downstream of River Bend Park, across from the William Pond parkway entrance. Please email Nicole Carpenter (nmcarpen@gmail.com) to be on the stewardship email list. She will only send cleanup announcements, parking passes, and cancellation notices to her email contacts.

Sunday, Oct 1, Online Sale Pick-up VOLUNTEERS NEEDED:

PLANT PULLERS– 8:30am until about 1 pm; 8 people needed. JOB: Fill orders by collecting plants from the nursery and placing them in wagons for transport to the pick-up area. Familiarity with the layout of the nursery and native plants is helpful.

PLANT PORTERS– 8:30am until about 1pm; 8 people needed. JOB: Take the wagon from the nursery to the pick up area and place the order on the table. This position entails a fair bit of walking.

CUSTOMER SERVICE– 8:30 until noon, or 11:30 until 3pm, 2 people per shift.

Take the orders from the tables and load them into the cars. Answer questions about the plants as needed. AM shift helps with set up, and PM shift helps with take down.

GREETER– 9 am until noon, or noon until 3pm, 1 person per shift. JOB: Direct the vehicle to the proper lane for pick up. PLEASE SPECIFIY YOUR PREFERRED Shift & JOB, email Lorena at volunteersvcnps@gmail.com LINK

Cycles of fire

Many chaparral plant species “appear” only after a fire, when the dense shrubs have been burned away. Annual plants, such as golden eardrops (Ehrendorfia chrysantha), have seeds that need fire to germinate, and many bulb-forming plants, like mariposa lilies (Calochortus spp.), may bloom in great numbers after fires, taking advantage of abundant soil nutrients and increased light at ground level.

Seed dispersal

In chaparral's dense vegetation, some plants depend on animals to disperse seeds away from the parent plant because abiotic forces, such as wind, are not always effective. The bush poppy (Dendromecon rigida) produces seeds that have a nutrient-rich appendage, called an elaiosome, that is attractive to ants. Ants carry the seeds, with the attached food resource, back to their nest, and then discard the viable seed in their underground trash heaps. In this way, the seeds are dispersed away from the parent plant and are also protected from other seed predators.

Woodland Regional Park Preserve
Invasive Plant Control

This 160-acre alkali preserve owned and managed by the city of Woodland is home to many rare and endangered plants including the Palmated-bracted bird's beak (Chloropyron palmated), Brittlescale (Atriplex depressa), and San Joaquin spear scale (Extriplex joaquinana). Vernal pools are also present in the preserve's alkali clay soils. A created wetland attracts shorebirds, raptors, and waterfowl such as Wood Ducks.

However, the health of this unique, mixed ecosystem is at risk due to an over abundance of invasive plants species. Stinkwort (Dittrichia graveolens), perennial pepper weed (Lepidium latifolium), Russian knapweed (Rhaponticum repens), and yellow starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis) is just a small list of non-native plants encroaching into sensitive areas and negatively impacting the site. Ongoing weed control activities continue.

Contact Jennifer Hogan at jen.hogan1223@att.net if you'd like to volunteer at the Woodland Regional Park Preserve.

Cycles of fire

Many chaparral plant species “appear” only after a fire, when the dense shrubs have been burned away. Annual plants, such as golden eardrops (Ehrendorfia chrysantha), have seeds that need fire to germinate, and many bulb-forming plants, like mariposa lilies (Calochortus spp.), may bloom in great numbers after fires, taking advantage of abundant soil nutrients and increased light at ground level.

Seed dispersal

In chaparral's dense vegetation, some plants depend on animals to disperse seeds away from the parent plant because abiotic forces, such as wind, are not always effective. The bush poppy (Dendromecon rigida) produces seeds that have a nutrient-rich appendage, called an elaiosome, that is attractive to ants. Ants carry the seeds, with the attached food resource, back to their nest, and then discard the viable seed in their underground trash heaps. In this way, the seeds are dispersed away from the parent plant and are also protected from other seed predators.
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